Entries by Lee Reich

FORWARD, WITH FIGS

Potted Figs, but First a “Haircut” Temperatures here have dipped into the lower 20s a few nights and still dip readily to around freezing, which might lead some of you to believe I have been neglectful of my fig trees, which are still outdoors. Not so! They are subtropical plants that can take temperatures down […]

IN WHICH A SMALL GAS MOLECULE HAS A BIG EFFECT

It’s a Gas Ethylene is so simple. It’s a gas made up of merely two atoms of carbon and four atoms of hydrogen. Simple gases are generally not the kinds of molecules that make plant hormones which, like human hormones, are generally complex molecules with dramatic effects at extremely low concentrations. Nonetheless, ethylene is a […]

MY NEW BOOK IS OUT!!

My newly published Fruit: From the USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection (Abbeville Press, 2022), now available here as well as from the usual sources, is a fusion of art, science and history in a 4.4” x 4.7” hardcover volume of 288 pages. The pocket-sized folio is like a miniature coffee table book, a celebration of fruit-growing in […]

A DIFFICULT NUT TO GET TO, BUT WORTH IT (IMHO)

Free Eats, and Delicious After last year’s bumper crop of black walnuts, filberts, and acorns, I didn’t expect much this year, nutwise. As I looked up into the few black walnut trees bordering the farmden, my low expectations seemed justified. In desperation of securing my annual supply of black walnuts, I gave a shoutout to […]

BITTERSWEET MEMORIES

I Almost Become Very, Very Rich My vision became blurred with dollar signs as I looked out the car window at mile after mile of bittersweet (Celastrus scandens) clambering over trees along a stretch of parkway. That was a few years ago, as I was driving away from a visit to New York City. While […]

MY FIG GROWS OLD, AND LOOKS IT

Weeping Fig, Growth in Check My little fig tree put on a lot of new growth this year. Let me qualify this statement. By “fig,” in this case, I mean my weeping fig (Ficus benjamina). It’s a relative of edible fig, also edible (but rarely eaten), and a common houseplant, valued for its relaxed appearance, […]

TOMATOES & CORN, TWO ALL-AMERICANS

Ode to Sungold As the curtain closes on the summer garden and the autumn garden edges towards its glory, I’d like to offer thanks. No, not a religious thanks for a summer of tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, okra, and other warm weather vegetables. But thanks to a person, the person who bred Sungold cherry tomato. Anyone […]

MORE OF MY FAVORITE TH . . . GRAPE VARIETIES

The Birds and the B . . . Vespids Hot and dry. What great summer weather it’s been here for grapes. Most years around this date, I’d go out every morning and pick bunches for fresh eating, continuing to do so for weeks to come. Alas, where there are grapes, you’ll find the birds and […]

THESE ARE A FEW OF MY FAVORITE TH . . . VARIETIES

Not a Research Station, but I do Test It seems that every couple of years or so, some kind gardener offers me seeds, plants, or just a recommendation for the best-tasting, earliest ripening, or longest keeping tomato. I’m appreciative, but these days usually refuse the offer or ignore the recommendation. True, In addition to providing […]